This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. For more information, see our privacy statement

New Left Review 78, November-December 2012


michael cramer

ROSSELLINI’S HISTORY LESSONS

Roberto Rossellini (1906–77) spent the last fourteen years of his career making what he called pedagogical films, principally for television. In his view, these works constituted a major break with existing cinema; they were a new form, neither art nor entertainment, and the director himself now wanted to be considered as an educator, not an artist. [1] Fereydoun Hoveyda and Eric Rohmer, ‘Nouvel entretien avec Roberto Rossellini’, Cahiers du cinéma, no. 145, 13 July 1963, in Rossellini, My Method: Writings and Interviews, ed. Adriano Aprà, New York 1995, p. 152. They included multi-part series on human historical development—the 5-hour The Iron Age (1964) and 12-hour Man’s Struggle for Survival (1967–69)—as well as portraits of innovators in the fields of politics—Cosimo de Medici, Louis xiv—and ideas: Socrates, Augustine, Descartes, Pascal. Rossellini’s account of Man’s Struggle for Survival, in a 1972 letter to the historian of American slavery, Peter Wood, gives a sense of the project’s ambitions:

Subscribe for just £36 and get free access to the archive
Please login on the left to read more or buy the article for £3

Username:

Michael Cramer, ‘Rossellini's History Lessons’, NLR 78: £3
Password:
 



If you want to create a new NLR account please register here

’My institution subscribes to NLR, why can't I access this article?’

Download a PDF file


See the contents of NLR 78


Buy a copy of NLR 78


Subscriptions